Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Sociological Images

Inspiring sociological imaginations everywhere.
Apr 10 '14
Diverse countries do better with female heads of state.
Countries with a lot of ethnic diversity generally show weaker economic growth than homogeneous countries.  A new study, however, discovered a variable that strongly reverses the trend: women leaders.
Management professor Susan Perkins and her colleagues compared the economic growth rate of 139 countries over 55 years.  They found that diverse countries did significantly better when a woman was at the helm.  The more diverse the country, the stronger the effect.
Perkins and her co-authors cautiously attempt to explain their data (here), but think that it may have something to do with leadership style.  Female leaders have been shown to be more collaborative and non-authoritarian than men. Co-author Nicholas Pearce speculates:

In countries with a lot of internal conflict, oftentimes people are looking for signals that the person in charge is going to be collaborative and not dictatorial or self-interested. Women’s gender role is symbolic of collaboration, that they’re going to empower marginalized voices.

Because of gender stereotypes, then, women may seem more trustworthy. Meanwhile, real differences in leadership style may affirm those expectations and be more effective in practice.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Diverse countries do better with female heads of state.

Countries with a lot of ethnic diversity generally show weaker economic growth than homogeneous countries.  A new study, however, discovered a variable that strongly reverses the trend: women leaders.

Management professor Susan Perkins and her colleagues compared the economic growth rate of 139 countries over 55 years.  They found that diverse countries did significantly better when a woman was at the helm.  The more diverse the country, the stronger the effect.

Perkins and her co-authors cautiously attempt to explain their data (here), but think that it may have something to do with leadership style.  Female leaders have been shown to be more collaborative and non-authoritarian than men. Co-author Nicholas Pearce speculates:

In countries with a lot of internal conflict, oftentimes people are looking for signals that the person in charge is going to be collaborative and not dictatorial or self-interested. Women’s gender role is symbolic of collaboration, that they’re going to empower marginalized voices.

Because of gender stereotypes, then, women may seem more trustworthy. Meanwhile, real differences in leadership style may affirm those expectations and be more effective in practice.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

  1. scandal-maniac reblogged this from socimages
  2. radicalsforrevolution reblogged this from socimages
  3. taruja reblogged this from eternalghostscout
  4. genderfluidfeminist reblogged this from eternalghostscout
  5. why-wolf reblogged this from socio-logic
  6. eternalghostscout reblogged this from i-aint-even-bovvered
  7. hermionesharrypotteressays reblogged this from i-aint-even-bovvered
  8. nymphsprout reblogged this from i-aint-even-bovvered
  9. i-aint-even-bovvered reblogged this from peekadora
  10. dissolvedinsomedream reblogged this from avocadontouchme
  11. avocadontouchme reblogged this from peekadora
  12. peekadora reblogged this from socimages
  13. vladschuler reblogged this from socio-logic
  14. pod-cats reblogged this from socio-logic
  15. rogueficcer reblogged this from thefutureisbroken
  16. nomoreyoyosplease reblogged this from socio-logic
  17. thefutureisbroken reblogged this from socio-logic
  18. cubstearns reblogged this from socio-logic
  19. ashharp reblogged this from socio-logic
  20. socio-logic reblogged this from thesocietypages-blog
  21. heretochangetheworld reblogged this from atypicalpisces